Editor

Darius Bost, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Ethnic Studies
University of Utah

Darius Bost’s research focuses in the areas of African American studies; feminist, gender, and sexuality studies; LGBTQ history; trauma and violence; and HIV/AIDS.  His first book, Evidence of Being: The Black Gay Cultural Renaissance and the Politics of Violence (University of Chicago Press, 2018), is an interdisciplinary study of black gay cultural movements in Washington, D.C., and New York City during the early era of the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. Evidence of Being won the Modern Language Association’s William Sanders Scarborough Prize for outstanding scholarly study of black American literature, and received Honorable Mention for the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero First Book Prize. Related research has been published in Journal of American HistoryCriticism, The Black Scholar, Souls, Palimpsest, Journal of West Indian LiteratureOccasion, and several edited collections. His research has been supported by the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University; Eccles Centre at the British Library; Woodrow Wilson Foundation; Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in the Social Sciences at Duke University; President’s Office and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs at San Francisco State University; Martin Duberman Visiting Scholars Program at the New York Public Library; and Provost’s Office at the University of Pennsylvania. His current book project is a transnational study of black queer visual cultures.

Editor

Wanda Pillow, Ph.D.

Professor
Gender Studies
University of Utah

Wanda S. Pillow is Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Utah where she offers undergraduate and graduate courses in gender, race and sexuality studies; Women of Color feminisms; decolonial theory; and research methods.  Pillow’s work focuses on intersectional analyses of the relationship between subjectivity, representation, policy and lived experiences. Pillow examines how certain subjects—such as the teen mother—are historically, legally, and discursively formed across cultural productions, policy, and lived experience.  Utilizing feminist genealogy, Pillow’s publications reveal and challenge colonial epistemics in theory, methodology and practice.  Currently, Pillow is tracing colonial relations of gender, race, sexuality and citizenship through Sacajawea and York of the 1804-1806 Corps of Discovery expedition.

Editor

Kimberly Jew, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Theatre and Ethnic Studies
University of Utah

Kimberly Jew teaches a wide range of topics ranging from Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, to theatre history, dramatic literature, and script analysis. Her expertise lies in 20th century American theatre. She has directed numerous university productions and has composed and edited a collaborative performance project based on local letters to the editor. Dr. Jew has written on a variety of topics, exploring the intersections of feminism, postcolonialism, theatrical experimentation and ethnic identity. Her essays can be found in the journals of Pacific Asia Inquiry, MELUS, and in the edited collections, Literary Gestures (Temple University), and Seeking Home (University of Tennessee Press), to name a few. Dr. Jew received her doctorate from New York University, master’s from Georgetown University and bachelor’s from UC Berkeley.

Silvia Patricia Solís, Ph.D.

Editorial Assistant
University of Utah

Silvia Patricia Solís is the Editorial Assistant for Frontiers. She is a newly minted Ph.D. from the Department of Education, Culture & Society, in the College of Education at the University of Utah. Her dissertation research traces indigenous and afro-descendant saberes curativos in the remembrances and garden practices of women of Mexican heritage living in the U.S./Mexico border. Her research focus on the areas of Anthropology and Education, Decolonial Feminist Thought, Feminist Methodologies, Saberes, Place and Land Education, Violence, Trauma, and Curative Knowledge.

Contact Us

Phone

801-581-5555

Email

FrontiersJournal@utah.edu